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WI-FI - Most Popular 2-way radio communication Protocol

Today, almost everyone is familiar with the term wi-fi (Wireless Fidelity). Wi-fi is a two-way radio communication protocol used for local area networking and connecting to the internet wirelessly.

Today, almost everyone is familiar with the term wi-fi (Wireless Fidelity). Wi-fi is a two-way radio communication protocol used for local area networking and connecting to the internet wirelessly.

Wi-fi was first released for general use back in 1997 by IEEE (The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). Wi-fi is the name given to 802.11 networking protocol, on which it operates. In 1999, a non-profit trade association was formed known as Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA) which in 2002 renamed itself to wi-fi Alliance. This Alliance owned the wi-fi trademark and was formed majorly to keep the interoperability of the wi-fi products in check or say regulating its standards.

Since its first release, wi-fi has seen many different versions (or, say, members of the 802.11 families). Initially, it was named 802.11, 802.11b, 802.11a, 802.11g, etc. However, in 2018, it was changed to a more straightforward numbering scheme of 1-6. Moreover, the protocols are now known as wi-fi 1, wi-fi 2, wi-fi 3 sequentially. Wi-fi 6 (802.11ax) is currently the latest version with better performance and enhanced power management. Moreover, every version is backward compatible, which means devices made for wi-fi 3 works fine with later versions and so on.

Wi-fi network is built with several hardware components like wireless access points or routers, end-user devices (like mobile phones, tablets, laptops) equipped with a wi-fi adapter. The wireless router is connected to the internet via a physical connection, that is, the fiber cable or an analog line that uses a telephone and a modem connected to the wireless router. A modem is needed for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog signal conversion. The wi-fi router then connects to the end devices via radio waves to establish an end-to-end internet connection. Here the wireless router receives the data from the internet, translates it into radio signals, and sends it over the wireless network to the connected devices. In the same way, data is sent out by the end devices.

Wi-fi most commonly uses the 2.4 gigahertz (UHF) and 5 gigahertz (SHF) radio bands; these are further subdivided into multiple channels. Multiple transmitters can use each channel, but they can be equipped by only one network at any point in time. Although the range of wi-fi typically varies from version to version of wi-fi, it is generally around 150 ft. Furthermore, being a radio wave, there can be hindrance indoors which will, in turn, reduce the wi-fi range.

Initially, the WEP encryption standard was used to secure wi-fi networks, but it had several flaws. In 2003 WPA (wi-fi Protected Access) became available, which was more secure and reliable. Similarly, WPA2 was released, and now WPA3 is the latest encryption standard for wi-fi. Connecting devices on unprotected wi-fi networks can expose data, including personal information, but this can be solved using VPN or HTTPS over Transport Layer Security (TLS).

With the astounding increase in internet traffic over the years, we have seen incredible growth in the bandwidth and speed of wi-fi. Wi-fi has changed the Internet Access design throughout and is now an integral part of our lives. There are more than 10 billion wi-fi-enabled devices as of now. However, wi-fi may not be a perfect match for IoT (Internet of Things), as it has certain limitations in terms of range and energy efficiency. Moreover, it still is a go-to option for many IoT applications such as home appliances, smart homes, surveillance and many more. was first released for general use back in 1997 by IEEE (The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). Wi-fi is the name given to 802.11 networking protocol, on which it operates. In 1999, a non-profit trade association was formed known as Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA) which in 2002 renamed itself to wi-fi Alliance. This Alliance owned the wi-fi trademark and was formed majorly to keep the interoperability of the wi-fi products in check or say regulating its standards.

Since its first release, wi-fi has seen many different versions (or, say, members of the 802.11 families). Initially, it was named 802.11, 802.11b, 802.11a, 802.11g, etc. However, in 2018, it was changed to a more straightforward numbering scheme of 1-6. Moreover, the protocols are now known as wi-fi 1, wi-fi 2, wi-fi 3 sequentially. Wi-fi 6 (802.11ax) is currently the latest version with better performance and enhanced power management. Moreover, every version is backward compatible, which means devices made for wi-fi 3 works fine with later versions and so on.

Wi-fi network is built with several hardware components like wireless access points or routers, end-user devices (like mobile phones, tablets, laptops) equipped with a wi-fi adapter. The wireless router is connected to the internet via a physical connection, that is, the fiber cable or an analog line that uses a telephone and a modem connected to the wireless router. A modem is needed for analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog signal conversion. The wi-fi router then connects to the end devices via radio waves to establish an end-to-end internet connection. Here the wireless router receives the data from the internet, translates it into radio signals, and sends it over the wireless network to the connected devices. In the same way, data is sent out by the end devices.

Wi-fi most commonly uses the 2.4 gigahertz (UHF) and 5 gigahertz (SHF) radio bands; these are further subdivided into multiple channels. Multiple transmitters can use each channel, but they can be equipped by only one network at any point in time. Although the range of wi-fi typically varies from version to version of wi-fi, it is generally around 150 ft. Furthermore, being a radio wave, there can be hindrance indoors which will, in turn, reduce the wi-fi range.

Initially, the WEP encryption standard was used to secure wi-fi networks, but it had several flaws. In 2003 WPA (wi-fi Protected Access) became available, which was more secure and reliable. Similarly, WPA2 was released, and now WPA3 is the latest encryption standard for wi-fi. Connecting devices on unprotected wi-fi networks can expose data, including personal information, but this can be solved using VPN or HTTPS over Transport Layer Security (TLS).




With the astounding increase in internet traffic over the years, we have seen incredible growth in the bandwidth and speed of wi-fi. Wi-fi has changed the Internet Access design throughout and is now an integral part of our lives. There are more than 10 billion wi-fi-enabled devices as of now. However, wi-fi may not be a perfect match for IoT (Internet of Things), as it has certain limitations in terms of range and energy efficiency. Moreover, it still is a go-to option for many IoT applications such as home appliances, smart homes, surveillance and many more.


Cheers,

Regami Solutions

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